Posts Tagged ‘golden rule’


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Recently, I have adopted a different view of karma.  I think it mostly impacts those that are aware of it.  Too often we will sit back and comfort ourselves knowing that we don’t have to get even because the person that wronged us will get what’s coming to them. But will they?  If they don’t believe in karma or the golden rule or a similar philosophy, then they may just keep taking advantage of people and be very successful at it. Do you that they’ll ever be happy?  Sure, why not?  If they have a view that they aren’t doing anything wrong, then there is no guilt for them.  Their conscience is clear.

But maybe, just maybe, one day they’ll see their actions for what they are.  I can’t hold out hope for that. I don’t see how that person is going to see things from my point of view all of a sudden.  Maybe one day someone will take advantage of them, but even so, if they don’t realize how their past actions impacted you, then they aren’t going to equate how they were treated to how they treated you.

Does that mean that I live my life differently?  No.  I’m aware of reaping what I sow, and I don’t want to reap unpleasantness.  Since I’m aware of karma, I’m subject to it, just like a cartoon character that is aware of gravity.  It would be against my nature to treat someone in a way that I would not want to be treated.

Metal Rules

Posted: May 12, 2012 in Random
Tags: , , ,

You’re familiar with the Golden Rule, right? Treat others the way you expect to be treated.  Well, I was thinking of a complementary rule that would say, Treat yourself the way you expect to be treated. Basically, if the Golden Rule guides your actions towards others, this rule would guide the way you act towards yourself.  If you expect others to give you respect, then respect yourself. Thinking along those lines.

I thought that maybe this new rule could be the Platinum Rule or something, but then I did some searching online and found that not only is Platinum taken, but so are other metals.  Here’s what I found.

  • Golden Rule – One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself.
  • Silver Rule – One should not treat others in ways that one would not like to be treated. (Basically the converse of the Golden Rule.)
  • Platinum Rule – Treat others in the way they like to be treated.
  • Bronze Rule – Do unto others as they have done unto you. (revenge)
  • Copper Rule – Do unto others as you expect they’ll do unto you. (suspicion/paranoia)
  • Iron Rule – Do unto others before they do unto you. (malice)
  • There is also a Brass Rule, but I can’t figure out exactly what it means.
  • Titanium Rule – Do unto others, keeping their preferences in mind.
  • Steel Rule – Do unto others as they have done unto you in the past. (seems similar to the Bronze Rule.)
  • Hot Potato Rule – Do unto the next person what the last person did unto you. (This sounds like parents that abuse their children because they were abused by their parents.)
  • Diamond Rule – Treat others as you believe they would want you to treat them, if they knew everything that you did. (This sounds like what parents attempt to do for their children.)

Other than the Golden Rule, I’m not sure how solid or even well-known these others are.  But since so many other metals are already taken, I think I’ll dub my rule the Tungsten Rule.  If you read a little bit about Tungsten, you’ll learn that it is a very tough metal with a high melting point and high density.  I think this fits because if you get yourself in the right place first, then it can be a strong foundation for how you treat others and the quality of your relationships.  I think if you respect yourself, then others will see that and will also respect you.  If you want to be loved, then love yourself first. Don’t wait for someone to have pity on you.

So here it is:

  • Tungsten Rule – Treat yourself the way you would like for others to treat you.

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